PRessed and stressed? Release, Cease and Desist

Being frustrated is a part of life.  It’s never good to hold on and internalize anger.

Have a best friend or friends you can vent to regarding any recurring frustrations.  Lately, I rely on my husband, my mother and my cousin for my venting and vulnerable purposes.  They understand what I go through and I return the favor to them when it’s their time to release their frustrations.

Here are some healthy ways to release that anger:

  • Type what you WISH you could say in an email but do not put the email address in the destination box
  • Draft a text to someone who constantly annoys you but don’t send it
  • Vent to someone to understand if you’re being reasonable.  Sometimes I bypass the perspective approach and go right to the other person being wrong when in fact it was my fault
  • Take a break from everyone, go walk around the office and ponder how you can approach the situation once the heat had died down

Just remember: release the anger, stop the brief vent and move on to other pressing matters.

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The Plan-Ahead

About a year ago I wrote about one’s image and standing out. With the holiday season approach, a good way to maintain and further progress your image to your clients is to plan ahead. Expecting the unexpected is key.

As an account manager in the food distribution industry, it is imperative that our operators follow strict rules.  We don’t want to mess with the integrity of someone’s food.  Knowing that sales will go up, being extra stocked during key holidays is essential.  Some operators will shut down upwards of a week while others, like myself, work only taking the actual holiday off.

Not only do we have to deal with possible freight and transit-time changes, but we will have price changes, promotions and expedited orders to manage and see through to the product ends at its intended location.  It can be overwhelming during the holidays but there is no need to stress.  Why you may ask? To reduce stress, make a “plan-ahead” plan can:

  1. Help your customers know what to anticipate coming down the pipeline
  2. Help yourself stay on track and have a to-do list weeks in advance
  3. Tackle some tasks earlier than anticipated so your list gets smaller and smaller closer to your deadline

A “plan-ahead plan” can simply be sending a reminder email to your client about the anticipated changes that you’re aware of or a quick internal meeting to tackle the necessary steps to keep track of a promotional item.  Doing this can in turn bring other changes to the client’s attention that may need immediate action before your task can get completed, such as a new UPC number for a box of napkins or an invoice discrepancy with a distribution center.

Another example of a “plan-ahead” action would be to push up delivery dates to your distribution centers a week in advance so that the carriers could have more time to spend with their families during the holidays.  Informing the distribution centers ahead of time about this adjusted delivery schedule would mean that these centers would need to stock up to ensure no disruption in the supply chain.  It would also mean that the carriers would anticipate more loads to move the weeks leading up to the holidays.

Having your departments interdependent on each other really helps with the checks and balances.  We may have to delay a price change to recoup lost funds or research recurring issues that happen every year during the same time period.  This will keep everyone on task and help prioritize.

Do you have a “plan-ahead” plan without realizing?

Pitch to End

In the world of PR, pitching is sometimes our way of networking and relationship building outside of social media.  We tend to monitor social media posts by journalists to get a feel of what their tone or personality is in order to better craft a pitch.

Picture Courtesy of Ragan's PR Daily
Picture from original article post: courtesy of Ragan’s PR Daily

Depending on the relationship the publicist has with the respected media professional as well as the tone of the message, there are appropriate ways to end an email.

If you’re pitching a press release regarding the loss of your company’s CEO, a publicist may not want to close their pitch email with “Cheers” or “Later, Vader.”  Fostering established relationships with the media is also important so you if an email is being sent to a current connection, ending the email a close such as “Until next time” may be more appropriate than a distant “Regards.”

Here are 35 other ways to close an email:

1. All the best
2. Anonymously
3. Be well, do good deeds, and keep in touch
4. Best wishes
5. Confusion to your enemies
6. Copyright 2014
7. Cordially
8. Enjoy your weekend
9. Fare thee well
10. Goodbye and good luck
11. Good job
12. Good luck
13. Have a good one
14. Have a great day
15. Hope this helps
16. In anticipation of your valued response
17. In my humble but accurate opinion
18. I thank you for your time
19. Keep up the good work
20. Live long and prosper
21. Looking forward to your reply
22. Stay tuned
23. Tag. You’re it
24. Take care
25. Thanks for your help
26. Thank you for your quick response
27. The end
28. This message will self-destruct
29. Very truly yours
30. Vive la revolution!
31. Wishing you continued success
32. With appreciation
33. With many thanks
34. You don’t need to see my credentials
35. Your friend

This post referenced Laura Hale Brockway’s post on Ragan’s PR Daily.