Climate control: Weathering tough times

Hurricane Harvey hit the city of Rockport, TX on Saturday, August 26, 2017.  The Category 4 storm has wrecked havoc on thousands of people in the Houston area. The storm is still affecting people three days later and devastation only getting worse.

With the unprecedented events from Hurricane Harvey, the National Weather Service is forecasting as much as 50 inches is to be expected in parts of Texas.  To aid the public in understanding the severity this storm may bring, and for future observation of higher levels of rain, the National Weather Service has updated their map to include two new colors.

Courtesy of the National Weather Service website
Courtesy of the National Weather Service website

Before the old map shows the greatest rain impact at “Greater than 15 inches”, with no clear end to what the greater means.  The map is now updated with the interval for dark purple to represent “15-20 inches” while the color plum now represents “20-25 inches” and light lavender represents “Greater than 30 inches”.

Through the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, the National Weather Service center’s update today reminds us all that even in the most unlikely event, it is still possible to have unhistorical events occur.  Although we’ve never seen 30+ inches of rain, that does not exclude that it is never possible to happen.

With more rain expected, many celebrities have participated in Kevin Hart‘s #hurricaneharveychallenge, donating $25,000 or more to the American Red Cross.  All citizens are encouraged to donate what they can to help.

Please keep everyone affected by Hurricane Harvey in your prayers.  DONATE if you can and remember the smaller towns near Houston that were affected are often overlooked when needing resources.

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Author: Cassandra Williams

Public relations and marketing professional. Subscribe to share my journey to fulfilling my dreams as a marketing and public relations professional.

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